Pride Patch Patterns: Aro (and Not Aro) Text

Six digitally-created versions of cross stitch pride patches, arranged in two rows of three, against a background of a textured partially-translucent aromantic pride flag. Text between the two rows reads Aro Pride Patches in black type. Patches include a rectangular patch in aroflux zigzag stripes, an idemromantic heart, an aro flag text patch reading "aro", a square in quoiromantic stripes, an arrow design in allo-aro colours and a second arrow in nebularomantic colours.

I have patterns I created for testing my new pattern template, patches I made but didn’t post about, patches I sewed onto my pride patch jacket but missed out on becoming tutorials, and patches discussed in previous tutorials that I mean to make for myself. It felt like time to make a post!

A cross stitch patch sitting on a blue microfibre blanket. The patch is a rectangle bearing text stitched in pride flag coloured stripes against a solid-coloured background and a matching embroidered border. Text reads "abro" in abro colours and block capitals with a dark purple background and border.

Folks who wish to find all my text patterns without having to scroll through tutorials and explanations can do so on my new text patch master page. Patterns are listed in alphabetical order (with my alphabet patterns at the end), while all sub-headers link to the tutorial posts featuring said pattern.

Please note that this post does not include photos of the other patches. They either don’t yet exist or were made as gifts by someone who forgot to first take a photo…

Notes on Pattern Structure

Full coloured blocks indicate a full cross stitch.

Letter outlines indicate backstitch.

Blocks divided on the diagonal by a line of backstitch, each half a different colour, indicate quarter stitches. Please see my first text tutorial for more information on backstitching outlines and placing quarter stitches.

Space for edging your patch is not shown in the patterns below. You’ll need to allow additional blocks for this when cutting your swatch, depending on how narrow or thick you like your edges.

Abro Patch Pattern – 10 Block, Upper Case

Abro cross stitch patch pattern with the text abro in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the mint/light mint/white/light pink/pink pride flag, with a dark violet background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in purple.

The five-stripe “abro” pattern fits a rectangle 34 stitches wide and 14 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 37 x 17 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

I made this patch using my grandmother’s vintage Anchor flosses. The colours aren’t correct–more like mint-blue than mint-green–but I don’t care. It’s special!

Allo-Aro Patch Pattern – 12 Block, Upper Case

Four stripe variant:

Alloaro cross stitch patch pattern with the text alloaro in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the dark green/green/white/pink alloaro pride flag, with a pastel grey-green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in green.

Six stripe variant:

Alloaro cross stitch patch pattern with the text alloaro in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the gold/yellow/navy/teal/light green/green oriented alloaro pride flag, with a black background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in pastel teal.

The four and six stripe “alloaro” patterns fit a rectangle 77 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 80 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Bi Patch Pattern – 10 Block, Upper Case

Bi cross stitch patch pattern with the text bi in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the pink/purple/blue bi pride flag, with a pastel background in the same colours. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in purple.

The five-stripe “bi” pattern fits a rectangle 14 stitches wide and 14 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 17 x 17 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Flags without white stripes are wonderful because I can sew the background in lighter (or darker for a pastel flag) colours to look like the text is set on the flag itself.

Lith Patch Pattern – 10 Block, Upper Case

Lith cross stitch patch pattern with the text lith in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the red/orange/yellow/white/black pride flag, with a mint background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in green.

The five-stripe “lith” pattern fits a rectangle 30 stitches wide and 14 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 33 x 17 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

P(o)ly Patch Pattern – 12 Block, Upper Case

Polysexual cross stitch patch pattern with the text poly in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the pink/green/blue polysexual pride flag, with a black background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in pastel green.

The four-stripe “poly” pattern fits a rectangle 45 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 48 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

This one I’m making to add to my jacket! I also wondered what the text would look like with the lightened flag background, because I like the effect on the “bi” patch:

Polysexual cross stitch patch pattern with the text poly in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the pink/green/blue polysexual pride flag, with a pastel background in the same colours. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in dark green.

Without photo evidence, you’ll have to trust me that the bi patch is really cute once worked up and finished (I used a purple buttonhole stitch). I am also excited to make myself the “poly” patch, since it feels like “polysexual” is often one of the half-forgotten multisexual identities.

It’d be remiss of me to conclude this post without mentioning that bi aros can sew the “bi” pattern alongside the five-stripe “aro” pattern from my second text tutorial, each in their respective flag colours, to make a “bi aro” patch. Same goes for the five-stripe aro-ace design … and the abro and lith patterns above!

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