Pride Patch Tutorial: Aro Text, Part Five

Six digitally-created versions of cross stitch pride patches, arranged in two rows of three, against a background of a textured partially-translucent aromantic pride flag. Text between the two rows reads Aro Pride Patches in black type. Patches include a rectangular patch in aroflux zigzag stripes, an idemromantic heart, an aro flag text patch reading "aro", a square in quoiromantic stripes, an arrow design in allo-aro colours and a second arrow in nebularomantic colours.

Part five in this text patch miniseries provides a collection of patterns for pride flags with three, four and six horizontal stripes. Now an even greater diversity of aromantics can celebrate Aro Week by making their own cross stitch pride patches!

Four cross stitch patches, three finished and one unfinished, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket. All feature block capital letters sewn in their respective pride flags: apl (aplatonic), quoi (quoiromantic), aego (aegoromantic) and queer (rainbow/LGBTQIA+), with each letter outlined in backstitch. The apl, quoi and aego patches are finished with a buttonhole-stitch embroidered edging, while the queer patch is sewn on a piece of black, untrimmed aida cloth.

You’ll need familiarity with cross stitch (full crosses) and backstitch to make unedged patches, along with a buttonhole/closed blanket stitch to make the edged patches shown above. The first instalment of this patch tutorial series demonstrates cross and blanket/buttonhole stitch, while the second covers backstitch. These patterns include quarter stitches, but they can be omitted if preferred.

For a complete guide to the stitching process for text patches, please see part one of this miniseries, where I’ve posted step-by-step instructions for stitching text. All patterns in this series can be similarly modified in terms of letter spacing, adding/subtracting quarter stitches and layout.


Notes on Pattern Structure

All patterns comprise block-style capital letters twelve blocks tall and nine blocks wide (exceptions: the letter “I” is three blocks wide, while “R” is ten). Every letter can be evenly divided to fit flags with three, four and six horizontal stripes.

Full coloured blocks indicate a full cross stitch.

Letter outlines indicate backstitch.

Blocks divided on the diagonal by a line of backstitch, each half a different colour, indicate quarter stitches. Please see my first text tutorial for more information on backstitching outlines and placing quarter stitches.

Space for edging your patch is not shown in the patterns below. You’ll need to allow additional blocks for this when cutting your swatch, depending on how narrow or thick you like your edges.

Aro Patch Patterns

All patterns in this post use variants of the letters “A”, “O” and “R” from my original four-stripe aro and aro-ace patches, so I’ll begin with updated patterns for these identities!

The four and six stripe “aro” patterns fit a rectangle 35 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 38 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Four stripe variant:

Aro cross stitch patch pattern with the text aro in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the green/yellow/grey-green/black aro pride flag, with a grass green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in green.

Six stripe variant:

Aro cross stitch patch pattern with the text aro in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the teal/olive/green/ecru/red/maroon aro-spec pride flag, with a blue-green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in grey-pink.

Aro-Ace Patch Patterns

The three, four and six stripe “aroace” patterns fit a rectangle 68 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 71 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Four stripe variant:

Aroace cross stitch patch pattern with the text aroace in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the mint/white/purple/indigo aroace pride flag, with a green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in lavender.

Six stripe variant:

Aroace cross stitch patch pattern with the text aroace in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the green/grass-green/white/pink-purple/purple/blue-teal aroace pride flag, with a violet background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in mint green.

Three stripe variant:

Aroace cross stitch patch pattern with the text aroace in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/blue/grey aroace pride flag, with a blue-grey background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in iron grey.

In-progress patch examples of the older four-stripe aro-ace design are available in part two of my text miniseries.

Aego Patch Patterns

The four-stripe “aego” patterns fit a rectangle 46 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 49 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Aego folks who are new to cross stitch or embroidery should first attempt the simpler first or second patterns. I feel that the triangle shape looks more like random blocks of colour scattered across the text without also sewing a faded variant into the background, so I added this in the third version of the pattern. It is, however, more complicated (and time-consuming) to sew.

The third variant also requires more floss colours. You may prefer to use colours with greater or lesser contrast to the background.

First variant (no triangle, plain background):

Aego cross stitch patch pattern with the text aego in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/grey/white/green aego flag, with a mint background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in black.

Second variant (triangle, plain background):

Aego cross stitch patch pattern with the text aego in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/grey/white/green aego flag, with a mint background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in black. A pixelated triangle, decreasing towards the centre, has been laid over the letters in reverse stripe order.

Third variant (triangle, filled-in background):

Aego cross stitch patch pattern with the text aego in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/grey/white/green aego flag, with a mint background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in black. A pixelated triangle, decreasing towards the centre, has been laid over the letters and background in reverse stripe order.

Please note that the light blue in the third pattern is there for visual contrast, not as a colour recommendation. In the sewn patch, I used an off-white colour (DMC 945) that has a teensy bit of contrast with my bright white:

A finished patch, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket, with the block letters "aego" cross stitched in the colours of the black/grey/white/green (with triangle in reverse colours) aego flag and a matching background. The letters are outlined in a thick black floss, helping them stand out from the background. The patch is edged with a mottled green and black buttonhole stitch.

For most patches, I sew the text first, followed by the background colour. For the third aego patch, which needs precise placement of colour blocks in text and background, I found it easiest to sew a single letter and fill in the background around that letter before moving to the next. This meant I could check (and correct) the angles of the triangle while I worked.

A white aida swatch, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket, with the block letters "a" and "e" cross stitched in the colours of the black/grey/white/green (with triangle in reverse colours) aego flag and a matching background. Without an outline, the letters are hard to distinguish from the background.

You may also note that I skipped a row for the uppermost-part of the triangle (green stripe overlaying black) so the barest edges of black would show on the lettering. I don’t think this terribly obvious, but this means my triangle is not a true match for the aego flag. You may prefer to narrow the triangle so more of the black shows on the letters–or reshape it altogether.

Cupio Patch Pattern

The four-stripe “cupio” pattern fits a rectangle 51 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 54 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Cupio cross stitch patch pattern with the text cupio in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the grey/lavender/white/pink cupio flag, with a purple background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in light grey.

Fray Patch Pattern

The four-stripe “fray” pattern fits a rectangle 45 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 48 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Frayromantic cross stitch patch pattern with the text fray in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the blue/cyan/white/iron grey fray flag, with a light grey background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in navy.

Lith Patch Pattern

The three-stripe “lith” pattern fits a rectangle 40 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 43 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Lithromantic cross stitch patch pattern with the text lith in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the green/yellow/grey lith flag, with a dark green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in light green.

Quoi Patch Pattern

The four and six stripe “quoi” patterns fit a rectangle 40 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 43 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Four stripe variant:

Quoiromantic cross stitch patch pattern with the text quoi in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/green/cyan/light grey quoiromantic flag, with a teal-blue background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in mint.

Six stripe variant:

Quoiroquoix cross stitch patch pattern with the text quoi in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the black/grey/green/cyan/white/black quoiroquoix flag, with a teal-green background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in mint.

Note: not all quoiromantic folk consider their identity aromantic, but I include these patches here for quoiros like me, who do.

A finished patch, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket, with the block letters "quoi" cross stitched in the colours of the black/lime/cyan/grey quoiromantic pride flag on a blue background. The letters are outlined in light aqua floss. The patch is edged with a mottled blue and light aqua buttonhole stitch.

Recip Patch Pattern

The four-stripe “recip” pattern fits a rectangle 51 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 54 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Recip cross stitch patch pattern with the text recip in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the red-pink/pink/white/black recip flag, with a mint background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in maroon.

Bonus Patterns

I also have a few patterns for LGBTQIA+ identities that aren’t strictly aromantic but may accompany, encompass or shape an individual’s aromanticism.

Aplatonic:

The four-stripe “apl” pattern fits a rectangle 35 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 38 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Aplatonic cross stitch patch pattern with the text apl in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the violet/blue/green/cream pride flag, with an indigo background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in light green.

A finished patch, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket, with the block letters "apl" cross stitched in the colours of the purple/blue/lime/cream aplatonic pride flag on a lilac background. The letters are outlined in light lime floss. The patch is edged with a mottled sky blue and lilac buttonhole stitch.

Asexual:

The four stripe “ace” pattern fits a rectangle 35 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 38 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Ace cross stitch patch pattern with the text ace in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the indigo/purple/pink/white-pink ace pride flag, with a blue-purple background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in light indigo.

Queer:

The six stripe “queer” pattern fits a rectangle 57 stitches wide and 16 stitches high. Assuming a three stitch border, as for my other patches, this means you’ll want a 60 x 19 block swatch plus any excess (if used unmodified).

Queer cross stitch patch pattern with the text queer in upper-case block lettering, striped in the colours of the red/orange/yellow/green/blue/purple rainboiw pride flag, with a violet-blue background. Pattern is set on a light grey grid. Letters are outlined, indicating backstitch, in light teal.

An unfinished patch, sitting on a blue microfibre blanket, with the block letters "queer" cross stitched in the colours of the red/orange/yellow/green/blue/purple rainbow/gay/LGBTQIA+ pride flag on a black background The letters are outlined in white floss. The raw black edges of the aida have not yet been trimmed or embroidered.

Modifications

A further range of identities can be stitched in their flag colours by adding and subtracting letters from different patterns (many now available as patterns on my text patch pattern archive):

  • Aromantic identity can be emphasised by adding the “ro” from the aro pattern to most of the above designs: “quoiro”, “recipro”, “frayro”, etc.
  • Aro-ace aplatonic, fray, quoi, recip, cupio and aego folks also can add their respective identity patterns to the aro-ace pattern.
  • Alloaro or aroallo is easily made by taking the aro pattern and the “L” from the lith pattern. Some combo flags, the four-stripe pink/green allo-aro flag and the six-stripe oriented allo-aro flag will fit this text.
  • A cupiro design is easily made from the cupio pattern by adding an “R” from the recip or aro patterns. You’ll want the four-stripe cupiroflux flag for this variation.
  • Placio is also made by combining letters from the cupio and apl patterns.
  • Greylithromantic folks can make “greylith” or “greylithro” patches by adding the “G” and “E” from aego, the “Y” from fray and the “R” and “O” from aro to the “lith” pattern.
  • Polarromantic folks can create “polar” or “polarro” patches with letters from the cupio, lith and aro patch patterns.

A few non-aromantic identities are also possible:

  • Alterous people can make an “alt” patch from the lith and apl patches, using the four-stripe alterous flag.
  • Gay folks can combine the “g” from the aego pattern and the “ay” from the fray pattern to stitch the rainbow flag (and many other lesbian and gay male/masc flags).
  • Combining letters from the cupio, fray and lith patterns creates a “ply” or “poly” patch that fits the polysexual flag.

For tips on spacing, tracking and arrangement, please see my five-stripe aro alphabet post. As with the five-stripe alphabet, some patches may read better if the space between certain letters is reduced. My fray pattern, above, reduces the space between the “F” and the “R” for this reason.

Folks may have noticed that I’m halfway to creating another alphabet in this post alone, and designing just a few more letters (like “s” and “n”) further expands the identities able to be represented in text patch form. A complete four-stripe alphabet is one of my pattern goals, so please check back over the next few months!

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